1. Bluebells: a naturalizing beauty for any woodland or shade garden setting (seen here in a Wheaton, Il. landscape)

    May 2, 2017 by MAX
    native and natural landscapes, shade gardens of Wheaton

    Bluebells a bloomin!
    Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia) in bloom in Wheaton, Il. mid April. Quite a show. Mertensias  naturalize well, come up all over, then quickly vanish.

    Also a bumblebee magnet. Important and early species, provides important nectar for pollinators. Even competes well with invasive species such as garlic mustard!

    Bluebells (Mertensia virg.)  a native woodland ephemeral, good for wooded, shaded and wetter areas. Will spread well if content. Mix with later blooming plants such as fern, hosta, zig zag goldenrod, shrubs such as Spicebush, witchhazels, and pawpaw.

     

     


  2. Natural stone beauty of the Shawnee, deep in So Il.

    March 30, 2015 by MAX
    native and natural landscapes,maxlandscape.com

    One of many natural rock cascades: this one near the old stone fort, within Giant City   S. P., on a fine, early spring day in March!

     

    Landscape season is upon us, finally!

     

     

     

     


  3. Early blooming plants in the late winter landscapes of West Chicago and Wheaton area.

    March 13, 2015 by MAX
    maxlandscape company in Winfiled, West Chicago, Wheaton shade gardens and landscaping

    Native and ornamental witchhazels attract pollinators, which is especially important early in the season for these hungry bees, as seen in this colorful landscape in West Chicago Wheaton area. Seen… the hungry honeybee here……and  On March 12th.!!!

    Seen: Hammemalis ‘Arnold’s Promise’

     

     

    Landscape design services ( Glen Ellyn, Wheaton,  Winfield,  West Chicago, Lisle, Geneva gardens, St. Charles Il)  focusing on your likes and needs. Contact us now, the gardens as seen here have started popping! !!

    Spring cleaning up and mulch time too!

    * (for the record…1st blooms seen on 3/10 in this Midwestern woodland garden).

     

     

     

     


  4. A Naturalists dream: the now rare White Trillium (t. grandiflora)

    February 13, 2014 by MAX

    A beauty in the shade gardens, or woodland settings, now rarely see in our native landscapes due to browsing deer and invasives such as garlic mustard, a must have for any landscape that has decent soils and some shade. . Slow to establish, but a real gem in the shade gardens.

    maxlandscape.com, West Chicago native wildflower


  5. Tips for a Greener holiday: Cut your own!

    December 3, 2013 by MAX

    A great tip for saving huge money: avoid buying greens (flown in all the way from the Pacific NW), and use your own trimmings, from your own yard! If you have a decent variety of shrubs and esp. evergreen- avoid too much trimming in summer, and do it in late Fall. You’d be amazed at the beautiful assortment of greens right outside your door.Arborvitae, White Pine, Spruce, Yew, and Boxwood grees, plus red-berried Winterberry-all Ed Max’s favorites for wreaths, swags, outdoor planters etc, even centerpieces. So get out there, and start trimming!Happy Holidays!

    Thuja, prefers moist areas.

    Arborvitae (thuja) trimmings, for swags, wreaths etc, and they are from your own yard!

     

    Will grow well in your gardens, Dupage, Kane or Cook Co.

    WINTERBERRY (ILEX vert.) Bright carmine red berries cover this bush in fall- cut for the touch of color in your outdoor holiday decor, plus will grow well in your wet  gardens, Dupage, Kane or Cook Co., BIRD attractant!

     

     

     

     

     


  6. The peril of our beloved Monarch

    November 30, 2013 by MAX

    PLANT, PRESERVE AND ADVOCATE FOR THE MILKWEED FAMILY (Aesculus),

    WHY?

     

    This plant family is the the only lifeline for the endangered Monarch butterfly. On it’s migration northward from the depleted forests where it winters to the wind-swept prairies of the Southwest, to the monoculture cornfields of the Midwest; the monarch is not doing well. And then there it the MONSANTO monster called ‘BT’ ready corn. This genetically altered corn hybrid creates pollen that, once adrift, kills all larvae, including that of the monarch butterfly. So, there you have it. In a decade or two, you may only see images of monarchs on a site like this. Let’s hope not.

    milkweed, (aesculus syriaca

    Fragrant, draws all osrts of unusual bugs, and of course-the Monarchs, which will lay eggs on this plant

    They may rebound.  But it is not looking so swell. From record populations (in Mexico during winter) in the hundreds of millions  documented for a millennia, to a paltry few million or less this year is alarming, as seen (or not) in the forests on one small but important area near central Mexico. There too the problems for this fragile creature are present: illegal logging.  Though slowed and perhaps even stopped, the damage has been done. It seems that the lack of dense forest cover in the mountains where they used to ‘ drape the trees’, has thus allowed colder temperature to penetrate- and a few winters have had devastating results.

    natives, miklkweed, aesculus, maxlandscape.com

    Monarch larvae on a milkweed plant seen in one the natural areas near Chicago .


  7. Intense fall colors of the Japanese Maple group

    November 27, 2013 by MAX
    Ornamemtal Japanese maples, maxlandscape.com

    Nothing comes close to the sight in late fall of this green leafed Japanese maple (Acer )


  8. stone creations by max’s greener places, west chicago, il

    November 22, 2013 by MAX

    let’s plan on your new landscaping and stonework now for the 2014 season!

    Boxwood hedges add formality

    Pink roses, formal boxwood hedge, paver walkways, west Chicago il


  9. Paver projects: new patios, or natural walkways, click on pic to enhance

    November 19, 2013 by MAX
    Patios, walkways, stone, brick, Aurora, Geneva

    A newer product intro from Uni-lock, and I like it!
    Have dealt with and seen many a faux stone product over the years, and not been so impressed with the final results.  This product comes the closest.