1. Native species for our native places (like that unsightly border you view out there)

    February 11, 2017 by MAX
    Shade beds, native wildflowers of our woodlands, low maint. ,

    Natural landscapes, with Redbud, bluebells, native plants!

    How many borders do we all stare out at that LACK any sort of function or beauty? Suburbia is loaded with nasty untended and overgrown borders between properties. Full of mulberry (origin: China), Buckthorn (origin: Eurasia), Various honeysuckles (Origin: Asia). None of which do anything but cost monies to remove or maintain.

    Why not cut it out, plant in something worth looking at, AND benefits the local wildlife such as pollinators and monarchs, song birds etc? As I write the statistics bear out some grim news: monarch populations down 80 -90% in the last 25 years, hundreds of song birds- all on the decline.  YOU can help by renovating that border: plant in native shrubs, add a swath of native perennials and prairie species, even add some evergreen for screening (and cover for birds). It’s fun, and rewarding! Contact me for a list of native plants, for color, and healthful attributes for the birds and bees! Pictured is a red monarda in this Naperville landscape design.

    Native Naperville landscapes by Ed Max, maxlandscape.com

    Monarda hybrid (but still a native) is a true magnet for all pollinators, hummingbirds, and butterflys.                         Plant native species !

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Contact us for a list of beneficial trees, shrubs and native perennials for your gardens soon!

     

     

     


  2. An increasingly rare wildflower seen in this native wildflower garden in Oak Park Il, (pic by landscape designer and naturalist Ed Max @ maxlandscape.com

    December 22, 2015 by MAX
    OaBrook Il landscaping beds full of natibe species and woodland perennials.

    Close relative of the colorful Bleeding Heart, but native and becoming rarer in our increasingly degraded ecosystems of the Chicago region. Rare plants are a passion of Ed Max, and restoring their habitats is Ed’s mission as well as his landscape company.

    Plant in spring in a rich soil, in full shade or part sun.  All Spring Ephemerals such as this dicentra tend to appear early, and vanish just as quickly. With luck, proper soils, and moisture- you will get this cool wildflower to reproduce and naturalize, as it has done here in this Oak Park, Il. landscape  (designed by Ed Max of Max’s Greener Places).

    Contact us now to plan your wildflower garden. Good for you and the pollinators!!!!

     

     


  3. Hardy Cactus in the Chicagoland landscape. One of designer and naturalist Ed Max’s favorite native perennials; as seen in this Oak Park Il prairie landscape

    December 21, 2015 by MAX

    Opuntia (Prickly Pear cactus) is a native of sandier habitats within the Chicagoland Wilderness. Adding them into your drier, sunnier beds will add a blast of lemon yellow blooms in late spring, followed by the edible fruit in late summer. Super hardy, just averse to wet conditions, so placement is important.

    landscape with natives , Ed Max is an arborist, naturalist and landscape designer from Wheaton, and Naperville Il.

    Native, spiny, and edible cactus in the landscapes of West Chicago, and St. Charles. Landscape designer Ed Max uses this unusual native often. Easy to care for- just be sure its in a well drained and sunny location! This perennial can be  part of your drier locations too with little fuss.

    Bloom time: late spring , early summer. Easy to care for, just a bit spiny!

     

     


  4. Fire in the natural landscape: essential

    April 16, 2015 by MAX
    native lanndscapes and management by Ed max, maxlandscape.com

    An incredible remnant patch of virgin prairie, smack dab in the middle of an otherwise drab and industrialized area next to a very old pioneer cemetery.

     

    Fire, herbicide and labor are the only things we have to save gems filled with a rare habitat such as this virgin patch of prairie. Without intervention, this prairie would be overrun with invasive species, thus shading out the incredible array of plant species that can be found in St. Stephens Prairie, near the cemetery. Not often do we find a patch of undisturbed land from the 1800’s and perhaps long before that!

     

     


  5. Bloodroot: a native of fleeting beauty

    April 10, 2015 by MAX

     

     

     

    native plants, in a woodland landscape of West Chicago Il, maxlandscape.com,  Ed Max arborist, landscape design in Wheaton, Il

    A native wildflower – Bloodroot ( Sanguineria), has a bright daisy like bloom, very short bloom period, but well worth the effort to establish.

     

     

    landscape design near West Chicago and Wheaton il,

    Just emerging native bloodroot, a wonderful addition to the early Shade garden

    Native wildflowers – also call ‘Spring Ephemerals, inhabit our better quality woodlands, especially oak woodlands, where these fleeting blooms have evolved under the boughs of oaks since the last of the glaciers receded some 10,000 years ago. Their moji is to sprout, bloom, germinate, collect energy for their reserves, and then decline to dormancy: all before the elaves fully emerge above! Whew! Hence the reason to get out into your local oak grove to witness their fleeting beauty!

     


  6. Natural stone beauty of the Shawnee, deep in So Il.

    March 30, 2015 by MAX
    native and natural landscapes,maxlandscape.com

    One of many natural rock cascades: this one near the old stone fort, within Giant City   S. P., on a fine, early spring day in March!

     

    Landscape season is upon us, finally!

     

     

     

     


  7. It’s almost spring! Time to consider the landscapes

    March 2, 2015 by MAX

    It is time to get thinking about the landscapes. Time is upon us to get moving on that outdated garden, that uneven patio, and that eyesore of a front landscape. You know what I mean. Late winter is the time to get things lined up-so when the spring weather finally (?) hits , you will be prepared to move. Give a call or shoot off that email now!                   WILL SPRING EVER COME? This has been one of the top three coldest, snowiest Februaries on record-crazy!

    landscape company in Wheaton, Il, maxlandscape.com

    A sign of spring: the Winter aconite, which pops while the snow may still be present. Good for pollinators, given it’s early appearance. Though a non native, it will stay put in your woodland or perennial garden. Divide and move around while in bloom.

    Other early blooming plants for the garden: witch-hazels, forsythias, native wildflowers such as bloodroot, trillium, and violas, plus tulips, crocus, and hellebores.

    maxlandscape.com, west Chicago il and Winfield landscapes,

    maxlandscape.com, west Chicago il and Winfield landscapes,

     


  8. Potting up bulbs for spring color in the landscapes

    February 28, 2015 by MAX

    Potting up bulbs on a late February day. Sunny, but crazy, cold day !!!  Bulbs can sit unplanted, (but kept cold), and from my experience – once potted up, bloom nicely anyway. I prefer to pot my daffodils,  then set into the woodland shade gardens where I see fit and to fill in. Besides…

    Potting up up the bulbs. A bit late, but we'll see!

    A before shot- March 1

    Most of us cannot remember where they are needed until spring when things are in bloom anyways. I frequently plant on top of other plants that are not visible! So, give it a try- pot them up, force them early, then plant out where needed!

     


  9. Native Bloodroot – soon to appear

    March 12, 2014 by MAX

    We can’t wait for this snow to melt. One reason, is that when the soils are exposed to the sun in a woodland garden, Bloodroot, and many other very early spring ephemerals emerge-and quickly, before the trees leaf out. We here at Max’s Greener Places and maxlandscape.com try to incorporate native species into the landscape where at all possible. Reasons are: beneficial for all poliinators (many of which are on the decline), no need for additional water once established, and for their incredible beauty!

    Bloodroot  (Sanguniaria can).red juice from the root. Was utilized by native Americans in many ways.

    Dupage county natives, maxlandscape.com natives

    A native of our northern hardwoods and used in our landscape designs at maxlandscape.com , seen in Glen Ellyn, Wheaton shade gardens