1. Native trees of Illinois: The Famous White oak of McNab Illinois. The State Champion oak tree – and what a tree it is!

    January 18, 2019 by MAX
    White oak state champion tree seen by Ed Max in McNab Il, SW of Starved Rock.
    An incredible specimen. And the photo does not do justice. This White Oak 
    (native to Illinois and the Midwest ) is the largest of its species, 
    nearly 120 ft across!
    The white oak is a durable oak, and can grow to immense size as
    seen here. White oak or Quercus alba has a small acorn, and helps
    to support 100’s of species ; from mammals to fungi, to insects.
    And important species that we should be using much more in our
    urban and suburban landscapes, where space allows.
    A species for the future:
    As the climate continues to warm, the White oak may be a suitable landscape tree (native to the south), able to tolerate a tougher, drier, warmer climate going forward.





    Plant an oak today! Call Arborist Ed Max to set up a consultation on caring for your oaks, or for installing a few new red, bur or white oak, in your landscapes.


  2. Coldest, snowiest, wettest fall in a century!

    December 3, 2018 by MAX

    Read on

    PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
    NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CHICAGO/ROMEOVILLE IL
    1332 PM CST SAT DEC 1 2018

    …A Look Back at the Climate for Meteorological Fall (September,
    October, November) 2018 for Chicago and Rockford…

    At Chicago, the average high temperature for the fall season was
    59.3 degrees, which is 2.5 degrees below the 1981 to 2010 average.
    The average low temperature was 44.8 degrees, which is 1.6 degrees
    above normal. The mean temperature for the season was 52.1 degrees,
    which is 0.4 degrees below normal.

    A total of 11.68 inches of precipitation was recorded during this
    past fall, which is 2.17 inches above normal. There was a total of
    12.7 inches of snow recorded at Chicago, which is 11.3 inches above
    normal.

    Records established or tied during the fall months:

    September: Record daily high temperature of 93 degrees on the 20th.

    October: Record daily precipitation of 1.56 inches on the 1st.

    November: Record daily precipitation of 1.20 inches on the 26th.

    At Rockford, the average high temperature was 58.1 degrees, which is
    3.8 degrees below normal. The average low temperature was 40.8
    degrees, which is 0.3 of a degree below normal. The mean temperature
    for the season was 49.4 degrees, which is 2.1 degrees below normal.

    A total of 13.02 inches of precipitation was recorded during this
    past fall, which was 4.42 inches above normal. In addition, a total
    of 15.8 inches of snow was recorded, which is 14 Inches above normal.

    Records established or tied during the fall months:

    September: None.

    October: Record daily precipitation of 1.65 inches on the 1st.
    Record daily low temperature of 22 degrees tied on the 22nd.
    Record daily precipitation of 1.36 inches on the 30th.

    November: Record daily snowfall of 1.8 inches on the 9th.
    Record daily snowfall of 2.1 inches on the 17th.
    Record daily snowfall of 11.7 inches on the 25th.

    Record Snowfall of 15.8 inches for the fall season.

    (Thanks to the NWS)

     


  3. Elasticity seen in various species during and after the heavy snows of late November 2018

    December 2, 2018 by MAX

    We all saw the effects of this crazy late fall blizzard: bent trees (almost strictly mulberry, boxelder and white pine were most impacted species), flattened arborvitae, snapped pine limbs, and lost power. It was a doozie of a system, not seen or experienced in the western suburbs of Chicago in some time!

    Seen here are pics of bent Bald Cypress (Taxodium dist.) , damaged White pine (P. strobus) and  much unfortunate damage to Arborvitae (Thuja), and redbud, which is a species obviously susceptible to snow lads as we saw in this last blast.

    landscaping for the changing climate with durable trees such as bald cypress. Native landscaper Ed Max using weltand species for native landscapes.

    Snow-laden cypress morning after the heavy winter storm of late fall, and the ability of tree species to withstand damage. Blad cypress are a nice species to consdider for wet areas of the yard, fond of moisture, but a versatile plant. Will grow large, so needs room!
    A deciduous evergreen tree species- loses it’s needle after turning a lovely copper color in fall.Native to southern Il where you can see taxodium over a 1000 years old at the Cache river preserve in the Shawnee N.F.

     

     

     

     

     


  4. An effort to preserve ancient oaks (and restore the woodlands)

    November 20, 2018 by MAX

    Ed Max is an arborist with Maxs Greener Places, of West Chicago, Wheaton area , maxlandscape.com

    We care deeply about the preservation and care of centuries -old oaks such as this behemoth (Bur oak) and the species that have coevolved among the oak biome. Ed Max is an arborist and naturalist involved in oak woodland projects in the Chicagoland Wilderness.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Woodland restorations begin in winter, planning and cleaning.


  5. Milkweed (time to rename this one- it ain’t no stinkin weed!) Its actually a fantastic plant for your garden, and it helps save an imperiled species. Whats not to like? Except the weed part in it name?

    July 23, 2018 by MAX

    Ed Max collects milkweed species and uses in designs where he can.

    One of our more common milkweeds, and a life line to the struggling monarch populations. Plant more milkweed! Maxlandscape plants milkweed and all the other pollinator species to benefit butterflys and pollinators.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    landacpe with natives, natural landscapes designs by Ed Max, West Chicago, Il.

    Butterfly milkweed at Bluff Spring Fen, Elgin (also an asclepias)

     

     

    more butterfly weed, is a milkweed. Very pretty! Maxlandscape is a natives design company

    Aesclepias, native milkweed near Belmont prairie

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    As the summer winds along on its way-too-fast trajectory, do not let the summer slip away without planting pollinator friendly species- and milkweed. The bugs and pollinators will appreciate it! And so will you!

    Contact us about a nice list of mega pollinators- as in plants that really draw them in. Some do more than others!

    Late summer is a good time to seed, or plant plugs, well before winter. And have fun!