1. Unique landscapes & garden designs that include native species, heirlooms

    March 10, 2014 by MAX

    native landscapes, maxlandscape.com

    Native white oak, sumac, switch grasses, sedges, plus geranium and nepetas  as seen in this sun-drenched, dry xeriscape.  Even the stone is local!

    native landscsapes, designs by max's greener places


  2. Oakbrook Landscape Projects: patio and water feature (pondless) phases seen below

    December 5, 2013 by MAX
     
    A water feature has all the effects of a pond, but without the open water. Attracts wildlife as well.

     

    Oakbrook landscaping pond, patios, stone walks

    Will need a year or two to fill in. Using low grow native dropseed grasses, juniper, geranium, thyme, Asters

     

    Oakbrook, Downers Grove Il, landscapes

    Natural stone added to this waterfall, pondless water featrure. Sedges (Carex) are a good choice, esp. if the area is moist.

     

     

     

     

     

     


  3. The peril of our beloved Monarch

    November 30, 2013 by MAX

    PLANT, PRESERVE AND ADVOCATE FOR THE MILKWEED FAMILY (Aesculus),

    WHY?

     

    This plant family is the the only lifeline for the endangered Monarch butterfly. On it’s migration northward from the depleted forests where it winters to the wind-swept prairies of the Southwest, to the monoculture cornfields of the Midwest; the monarch is not doing well. And then there it the MONSANTO monster called ‘BT’ ready corn. This genetically altered corn hybrid creates pollen that, once adrift, kills all larvae, including that of the monarch butterfly. So, there you have it. In a decade or two, you may only see images of monarchs on a site like this. Let’s hope not.

    milkweed, (aesculus syriaca

    Fragrant, draws all osrts of unusual bugs, and of course-the Monarchs, which will lay eggs on this plant

    They may rebound.  But it is not looking so swell. From record populations (in Mexico during winter) in the hundreds of millions  documented for a millennia, to a paltry few million or less this year is alarming, as seen (or not) in the forests on one small but important area near central Mexico. There too the problems for this fragile creature are present: illegal logging.  Though slowed and perhaps even stopped, the damage has been done. It seems that the lack of dense forest cover in the mountains where they used to ‘ drape the trees’, has thus allowed colder temperature to penetrate- and a few winters have had devastating results.

    natives, miklkweed, aesculus, maxlandscape.com

    Monarch larvae on a milkweed plant seen in one the natural areas near Chicago .