1. Witch-hazels abloom- mid January !!! ??? A tad early?

    January 27, 2020 by MAX

    Wow. I’ve always been aggaga come 1st sighting of something popping – usually late winter /early spring. But the first half of January? That’s a record sighting for me. In the Midwest we are lucky to get a few sprigs popping through the crusty earth and snow come late February- even Witch-hazels (Hammemalis x med. cultivars) (though they usually bloom in late winter in the Chicago region). But mid – January – this was a colorful surprise for me. I Cannot say enough about Witch hazels. Every garden should have a few! And great fall colors too. A warm and easy winter it has been to date!

    Ed Max, naturalist, cert. arborist, and landscape designer,  specialty in native species and native landscapes.
    a very cool and unusual sight in our natural woodlands on 1-14-20

    Witch- hazels add color to your landscapes and are a perfect fit for shade gardens, woodland beds, or under shade trees, and in the natural landscape setting. Pollinators will seek this beauty out on warmer winter days as well, so how cool is that?

    Now is the time to get thinking about the landscapes and perhaps a new garden design, or a few new trees for the yard. Consider Native landscapes, and native species too, for the benefit of insects and wildlife !

  2. Liveliest colors in fall blooming aster, and pollinators love them all!

    September 25, 2017 by MAX

    New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) is one of the Midwestern natives and late blooming. Showy purple blooms w an orange eye. Deer resistant too! Grows to 3 or 4 ft, good for background , rear of sun beds.

    Also very drought resistant. Bees love them, as do monarchs which seek out all aster for late season food source.

    native species, natural landscapes by Ed Max, maxlandscape.com

    Late blooming native perennial, hardy, offers some of the best color in the late gardens.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Contact us soon for advice on late season colors, designs, and pollinator friendly habitats!

     

     

    native aster, woods aster of Wheaton landscapes

     

    Contact us

     


  3. Rare and beautiful White Ladies Slipper Orchid (Cypripedium candidum), a beguiling and shy native not suited to most of our landscapes

    May 19, 2017 by MAX

    And best left in the wild!, as seen here, and in nice numbers at this rather secluded and secret site near West Chicago, Winfield areas. A super rare native orchid-  mostly due to illegal,(and  bone-headed) harvesting from the wild. When dug in bloom, mortality rate is off the charts.  Endangered in most northern states, l,isted as threatened in Il.,

    Best admired, and photographed, but leave alone and enjoy this cool plant structure!

     

    native and natural landscaping in West Chicago Il, Wheaton Il natural shade beds, landscapes by ed amx

    White ladies slipper mid may 17, and native species of prairies, Midwest landscapes

    A denizen of wet prairies and fen habitats, with few remaining, so habitat is critical.

     


  4. Illinois State Champion White Oak (Quercus a.) near McNabb, Il.

    May 2, 2017 by MAX

    What a monster! To stand near this great plant is awesome! Thought to be at least 350 to 400 yrs old. SW of Starved Rock in the entrance to a farmhouse, you too can see it, near the roadside.

    native oaks, record size trees of Illinois

    Record size state champ, White oak. A very lg. tree.

     

    Oaks are an important species in the Midwest and in the Chicagoland area. Encourage oak planting. Many species rely on the oak for food and shelter. The native population of most oak species is on the decline due to disease, changing climate and especially due to invasive species such as buckthorn and Asian honeysuckle. Little to no regeneration of oaks means that as the large specimens as een here decline, we stand to lose a true legacy tree of the Midwest. Red , bur and white oak were the oak species most common a century ago, when fire was a common occurrence on the prairie.

    Today, with lack of fire, they are losing ground. So plant an oak today!

     


  5. Native Bloodroot – soon to appear

    March 12, 2014 by MAX

    We can’t wait for this snow to melt. One reason, is that when the soils are exposed to the sun in a woodland garden, Bloodroot, and many other very early spring ephemerals emerge-and quickly, before the trees leaf out. We here at Max’s Greener Places and maxlandscape.com try to incorporate native species into the landscape where at all possible. Reasons are: beneficial for all poliinators (many of which are on the decline), no need for additional water once established, and for their incredible beauty!

    Bloodroot  (Sanguniaria can).red juice from the root. Was utilized by native Americans in many ways.

    Dupage county natives, maxlandscape.com natives

    A native of our northern hardwoods and used in our landscape designs at maxlandscape.com , seen in Glen Ellyn, Wheaton shade gardens