1. For the love of trees : part 1 (in progress) (with views from an arborist)

    November 15, 2017 by MAX

    And what’s not to love? Check in here periodically to catch up on my musings of the tree, the magnificent, the mysterious and the important tree!  As a lover of trees, and as a professional arborist I never stop learning and investigating the incredible and diverse universe that is the tree. Think about it: what other group of plants (or animals perhaps?) on this planet has benefited mankind as much? Trees offer shelter or some form of benefit  to us and a vast chunk of life on this planet.  I’ll attempt to cover many forms of life benefiting from trees, along with the oldest of various species, and of course their awesome beauty, beginning with the oak family.

    Record size trees of Mossuri, arborist Ed Max, rcord trees of Iliinois, champion trees of America

    This massive Bur oak blew me away. Its sheer mass and height is unreal. Many species of birds, fungi, insects and mammals earn their living off this live behemoth.

    There are studies done on the life cycle of the native oak, and the estimates are that well over 20,000 different species of organisms rely on the oak family (Midwest region) for sustenance (both above ground, and below)

    native oaks, record size trees of Illinois

    State Champion White oak of Illinois. A very lg. tree indeed. Located just SW of Ottawa Il.. To think that this plant has been here since before the founding of the U.S.!

     

     

     


  2. Massive White Pine (P.strobus) in winter (click on pic)

    February 8, 2015 by MAX
    Arborsit info, maxlandscape.com, pine trees in the landscapes, max's greener places, Ed Max, arborist

    A grand specimen White pine, on the road close to Princeton’s cemetery, where the state’s largest pine exists.

    Pine and other evergreen materials add so much in our Midwestern winters and the landscapes. Seen here is a grand white pine dwarfing this  (late)  1800’s era home  in Princeton, Il. It would be my guess that this specimen has to be close to the age of the house, making it at least 125-150 yrs old.

     

     

     

     

     


  3. Fall color never fails to excite! Plant quality trees for color.

    October 14, 2014 by MAX
    maxlandscape.com, max's greener places plant suggestion, landscape design

    another max suggestion for fall colors, a part of our landscape that is terribly lacking in my opinion!
    Excellent plant for formal or natural landscapes

    Japmapleondrive2011

    Consider the sugar maple (acer) , for it’s outstanding colors, and hardiness, or perhaps a serviceberry (amelanchier can.) which is an ornamental, grows to 30′, has soft peach fall colors, an excellent tree for our Chicagoland landscapes. A hardy tree, and very popular.

     


  4. Discovering the true value of your trees, or trees you might be condisering:

    October 12, 2014 by MAX
    Give it a try- quite interesting, and an eye-opener. Trees are (in my opinion) greatlyundervalued. Seen below is a chart to use to discover their benefits!

    Thanks to Davey tree and others, now you can with ease!

    Then get out and plant that tree!

    🙂

     

     

     

    Understanding This Tool:The Tree Benefit Calculator allows anyone to make a simple estimation of the benefits individual street-side trees provide. This tool is based on i-Tree’s street tree assessment tool called STREETS. With inputs of location, species and tree size, users will get an understanding of the environmental and economic value trees provide on an annual basis.The Tree Benefit Calculator is intended to be simple and accessible. As such, this tool should be considered a starting point for understanding trees’ value in the community, rather than a scientific accounting of precise values. For more detailed information on urban and community forest assessments, visit the i-Tree website.

    National Tree Benefit Calculator


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