1. A Beautiful and Beneficial landscape project in Oak Park Il : a low-grow prairie with over 4 dozen native species and counting…..plus a water garden (to keep the run-off on site)

    March 1, 2020 by MAX
    renovations begin…
    a year in….

    What a response it has been (from the community AND the local wildlife) !!!

    As we thought trough this landscape installation, we had to think native, but lower growth height- to as not to impede visual clearance etc, as well as much thought going into species diversification, colors and bloom time. Species include 6 diiferent clumpoing grases (dropseed (Sporobolus, Little blues etc) plus wetland species (we diverted the gutters to a swale/water garden) like Lobelias, sedges etc, along with many native savanna blooming species to maximize great colors plus pollinator friendly species offering nectar and seedheads.

    The best time to get new landscapes installed is early to mid season- so contact us today for a consultation! Ed Max will stop by to see you.


  2. River Forest Landscape renovations of spring, let’s change that garden design!

    March 4, 2018 by MAX

     

     

    landscaping with natives, natural designs by max

    Landscape renovations as we redid this River Forest gem, using perennials, buckeye, asters, roses, and native species, and grasses, oak trees too.

     

    Spring is here- let us know if you are in need of clean ups, corrective pruning, light tree care,

    consultation on that new landscape design!


  3. Illinois State Champion White Oak (Quercus a.) near McNabb, Il.

    May 2, 2017 by MAX

    What a monster! To stand near this great plant is awesome! Thought to be at least 350 to 400 yrs old. SW of Starved Rock in the entrance to a farmhouse, you too can see it, near the roadside.

    native oaks, record size trees of Illinois

    Record size state champ, White oak. A very lg. tree.

     

    Oaks are an important species in the Midwest and in the Chicagoland area. Encourage oak planting. Many species rely on the oak for food and shelter. The native population of most oak species is on the decline due to disease, changing climate and especially due to invasive species such as buckthorn and Asian honeysuckle. Little to no regeneration of oaks means that as the large specimens as een here decline, we stand to lose a true legacy tree of the Midwest. Red , bur and white oak were the oak species most common a century ago, when fire was a common occurrence on the prairie.

    Today, with lack of fire, they are losing ground. So plant an oak today!