1. Native perennials in this West Chicago Landscape. (Mertensia virg., Bluebells)

    May 5, 2015 by MAX
    native landscapes of West Chicago,  custom design and landscapes of Wheaton,  shade gardens of Winfield

    In this wooded garden ….the Bluebells are thriving and in full bloom on Cinco de Mayo 2015, West Chicago Il, 60185.

    Native landscapes and pathways made of wood. Seen here in the shade garden. Stone and pavers aee also well suited for a shade garden or native landscape.


  2. Asimina: the native Pawpaw

    April 24, 2015 by MAX
    native trees, Ed max arborist, maxlandscape.com

    Of the custard family, and the only one of
    N A.. Highly edible fruit, long leaf, nice fall colors, a woodland denizen, forms colonies. To 20′.

    Seen here is its truly unusual maroon blossom. Takes two to cross pollinate!

    Site in :

    Full sun, part shade, in rich humus soils really helps.


  3. Natural stone beauty of the Shawnee, deep in So Il.

    March 30, 2015 by MAX
    native and natural landscapes,maxlandscape.com

    One of many natural rock cascades: this one near the old stone fort, within Giant City   S. P., on a fine, early spring day in March!

     

    Landscape season is upon us, finally!

     

     

     

     


  4. A Naperville cottage garden

    March 10, 2014 by MAX
    landscapers, naperville il, oak park il landscaping

    All mixed perennial patches need updating from time to time.

    A proper cottage garden begins with the setting: a charming home, a sun filled area, and a variety of plantings and bloom times. With all these ingredients- we have a chance to make something special!

     

     


  5. Witch-hazel ‘Jelena’ (Hammemalis med.), unusual, very early to bloom, so interesting!

    March 9, 2014 by MAX
    shrubs, trees, arborist , maxlandscape.com

    The earliest of any blooming plant in this West Chicago garden. Click on pic to  enlarge.

    A very cool plant- you will not find any other witch-hazel or other species of plant that blooms earlier, none! Fragrant too. And the bonus is that fabulous red/burgundy fall color!  Vase shaped habit, likes a bit of shade, growing to 8′ x 8′. One of Ed’s favorites!

     

     


  6. Tips for a Greener holiday: Cut your own!

    December 3, 2013 by MAX

    A great tip for saving huge money: avoid buying greens (flown in all the way from the Pacific NW), and use your own trimmings, from your own yard! If you have a decent variety of shrubs and esp. evergreen- avoid too much trimming in summer, and do it in late Fall. You’d be amazed at the beautiful assortment of greens right outside your door.Arborvitae, White Pine, Spruce, Yew, and Boxwood grees, plus red-berried Winterberry-all Ed Max’s favorites for wreaths, swags, outdoor planters etc, even centerpieces. So get out there, and start trimming!Happy Holidays!

    Thuja, prefers moist areas.

    Arborvitae (thuja) trimmings, for swags, wreaths etc, and they are from your own yard!

     

    Will grow well in your gardens, Dupage, Kane or Cook Co.

    WINTERBERRY (ILEX vert.) Bright carmine red berries cover this bush in fall- cut for the touch of color in your outdoor holiday decor, plus will grow well in your wet  gardens, Dupage, Kane or Cook Co., BIRD attractant!

     

     

     

     

     


  7. The peril of our beloved Monarch

    November 30, 2013 by MAX

    PLANT, PRESERVE AND ADVOCATE FOR THE MILKWEED FAMILY (Aesculus),

    WHY?

     

    This plant family is the the only lifeline for the endangered Monarch butterfly. On it’s migration northward from the depleted forests where it winters to the wind-swept prairies of the Southwest, to the monoculture cornfields of the Midwest; the monarch is not doing well. And then there it the MONSANTO monster called ‘BT’ ready corn. This genetically altered corn hybrid creates pollen that, once adrift, kills all larvae, including that of the monarch butterfly. So, there you have it. In a decade or two, you may only see images of monarchs on a site like this. Let’s hope not.

    milkweed, (aesculus syriaca

    Fragrant, draws all osrts of unusual bugs, and of course-the Monarchs, which will lay eggs on this plant

    They may rebound.  But it is not looking so swell. From record populations (in Mexico during winter) in the hundreds of millions  documented for a millennia, to a paltry few million or less this year is alarming, as seen (or not) in the forests on one small but important area near central Mexico. There too the problems for this fragile creature are present: illegal logging.  Though slowed and perhaps even stopped, the damage has been done. It seems that the lack of dense forest cover in the mountains where they used to ‘ drape the trees’, has thus allowed colder temperature to penetrate- and a few winters have had devastating results.

    natives, miklkweed, aesculus, maxlandscape.com

    Monarch larvae on a milkweed plant seen in one the natural areas near Chicago .


  8. West Chicago landscaping projects: 2012 xeriscaping w native species

    November 21, 2013 by MAX
    Drought tolerant species for a sun bed , landscape in West Chicago, Winfield, Wheaton Il area,

    Cactus and thyme, plus dropseeds-all planted in this harsh sunny spot to hold up well. Seen here in West Chicago, Il

     

     

     

     

     


  9. Ilex vert., common name : Winterberry. Excellent choice for wet areas of your yard!

    November 20, 2013 by MAX
    Ilex verticilata, maxlandscape.com, winfiled, il, west Chicago il wetland landscape

    The berry of this hardy and native holly can come in many colors.


  10. Paver projects: new patios, or natural walkways, click on pic to enhance

    November 19, 2013 by MAX
    Patios, walkways, stone, brick, Aurora, Geneva

    A newer product intro from Uni-lock, and I like it!
    Have dealt with and seen many a faux stone product over the years, and not been so impressed with the final results.  This product comes the closest.