1. Witch-hazels abloom- mid January !!! ??? A tad early?

    January 27, 2020 by MAX

    Wow. I’ve always been aggaga come 1st sighting of something popping – usually late winter /early spring. But the first half of January? That’s a record sighting for me. In the Midwest we are lucky to get a few sprigs popping through the crusty earth and snow come late February- even Witch-hazels (Hammemalis x med. cultivars) (though they usually bloom in late winter in the Chicago region). But mid – January – this was a colorful surprise for me. I Cannot say enough about Witch hazels. Every garden should have a few! And great fall colors too. A warm and easy winter it has been to date!

    Ed Max, naturalist, cert. arborist, and landscape designer,  specialty in native species and native landscapes.
    a very cool and unusual sight in our natural woodlands on 1-14-20

    Witch- hazels add color to your landscapes and are a perfect fit for shade gardens, woodland beds, or under shade trees, and in the natural landscape setting. Pollinators will seek this beauty out on warmer winter days as well, so how cool is that?

    Now is the time to get thinking about the landscapes and perhaps a new garden design, or a few new trees for the yard. Consider Native landscapes, and native species too, for the benefit of insects and wildlife !

  2. Massive White Pine (P.strobus) in winter (click on pic)

    February 8, 2015 by MAX

    Arborsit info, maxlandscape.com, pine trees in the landscapes, max's greener places, Ed Max, arborist

    A grand specimen White pine, on the road close to Princeton’s cemetery, where the state’s largest pine exists.

    Pine and other evergreen materials add so much in our Midwestern winters and the landscapes. Seen here is a grand white pine dwarfing this  (late)  1800’s era home  in Princeton, Il. It would be my guess that this specimen has to be close to the age of the house, making it at least 125-150 yrs old.

     

     

     

     

     


  3. Witch-hazel ‘Arnold’s Promise’ (Hammemalis x med.) (click on pic)

    December 10, 2013 by MAX

    A gem of a shrub: incredible sulphur-yellow spidery blooms in late winter- a stand out in the snowy landscape, plus this (see pic)  flamboyant display in autumn.   One of Ed’s top ten list of woodland shrubs.

    Shade gardens of Winfield

    A fantastic shrub for the woodland, shady garden